Visit Kenmore

When you visit Kenmore there is plenty to offer both the passing visitor and those wishing to stay awhile.

Boats can be hired at various points round the eastern end of the loch and an impressive outdoor pursuits centre, Croft-na-Caber, offers instruction and guidance in a range of outdoor activities from water-skiing to hillwalking.

For those more interested in the hills than the lochs, Kenmore is superbly located, offering convenient access to Glen Lyon, to the hills of Breadalbane and, north, to Schiehallion and beyond. Readily visible from the lochside is Ben Lawers, towering over the north side of Loch Tay, and falling only marginally short of the magic 4000ft mark. Just out of the village along the south Loch Tay road, is the Scottish Crannog Centre. The Centre is open daily from April to October between 10.00am and 5.00pm. The key exhibit is an authentic reconstruction of a Bronze Age defensive house - a crannog - perched above the loch on stilts. Crannogs, from the Gaelic word crann, meaning tree, were built on an artificial rock island with timber posts and struts supporting a hut above high-water level. They were to be found on many lochs, including Loch Awe and Loch Earn as well as Loch Tay, from prehistoric times up to the 1700s. Other exhibits include the sheepskin rugs and wooden bowls that the Crannog settlers would have used, and there are interesting demonstrations of Iron Age skills.

The parish contains also the hamlets of Acharn, Bridgend, Blairmore, Lawers, and Sronfernan.

The Campbells of Breadalbane were one of Scotland's greatest landowning families. At its height their estate extended to 437,696 acres and was over 100 miles long. From Aberfeldy it was possible to reach the west coast of Scotland without leaving the Breadalbane's land and at its heart lay Taymouth, a vast baronial castle, built at the height of the family's power. Boats can be hired at various points round the eastern end of the loch and an impressive outdoor pursuits centre, Croft-na-Caber, offers instruction and guidance in a range of outdoor activities from water-skiing to hillwalking.

For those more interested in the hills than the lochs, Kenmore is superbly located, offering convenient access to Glen Lyon, to the hills of Breadalbane and, north, to Schiehallion and beyond. Readily visible from the lochside is Ben Lawers, towering over the north side of Loch Tay, and falling only marginally short of the magic 4000ft mark. Just out of the village along the south Loch Tay road, is the Scottish Crannog Centre. The Centre is open daily from April to October between 10.00am and 5.00pm. The key exhibit is an authentic reconstruction of a Bronze Age defensive house - a crannog - perched above the loch on stilts. Crannogs, from the Gaelic word crann, meaning tree, were built on an artificial rock island with timber posts and struts supporting a hut above high-water level. They were to be found on many lochs, including Loch Awe and Loch Earn as well as Loch Tay, from prehistoric times up to the 1700s. Other exhibits include the sheepskin rugs and wooden bowls that the Crannog settlers would have used, and there are interesting demonstrations of Iron Age skills.

The parish contains also the hamlets of Acharn, Bridgend, Blairmore, Lawers, and Sronfernan.

The Campbells of Breadalbane were one of Scotland's greatest landowning families. At its height their estate extended to 437,696 acres and was over 100 miles long. From Aberfeldy it was possible to reach the west coast of Scotland without leaving the Breadalbane's land and at its heart lay Taymouth, a vast baronial castle, built at the height of the family's power.

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